IT - FOSS

3 Things You Don't Know About Open Source
TechRepublic, August 9th, 2019
Open source success is supposed to be easy to measure, but here are some indicators you may not have considered

"Open source purity contests are not uncomfortable, they are just boring," said Andrew Shafer, and he's right. This latest "contest" in question arose from Kelly Sommers' reaction to Amazon CTO Werner Vogels' tweet, complaining that Microsoft was hiking the cost of running its software on rival clouds so as to push customers to run workloads on Azure. Sommers' argument was hardly germane to Vogels' tweet, but it nonetheless kicked off a contentious discussion of what cloud providers like AWS "owe" to the open source code they monetize.

It's an abysmally tired debate, but this time it did yield some interesting insights. Here are three.


The Document Foundation released today the LibreOffice 6.3 open-source and cross-platform office suite for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms

"The third major, feature-full update to the latest LibreOffice 6 office suite series, LibreOffice 6.3, comes exactly six months after the LibreOffice 6.2 release to add better performance, enhanced interoperability with proprietary document formats, as well as a set of new features and other improvements.

The LibreOffice 6.3 office suite will be supported for the next ten months with smaller maintenance updates until May 29, 2020. The Document Foundation has planned a total of six point releases for LibreOffice 6.3, but currently recommends users the LibreOffice 6.2 series for extra stability in production environments..."


Open Source Has Never Been Stronger
InfoWorld, August 8th, 2019
With cloud companies open-sourcing their innovations, and enterprises increasing participation, open source sustainability is at an all-time high

"There has perhaps never been so much angst over whether open source software development is sustainable, and yet there has never been clearer evidence that we're in the golden age of open source. Or on the cusp. Here and there an open source company might struggle to make a buck, but as a community of communities, open source has never been healthier. There are a few good indicators for this..."

Open Source Is Good, But How Can IT Do Good?
Linux Journal, August 5th, 2019
Open-source coders: we know you are good - now do good

"The ethical use of computers has been at the heart of free software from the beginning. Here's what Richard Stallman told me when I interviewed him in 1999 for my book Rebel Code:

'The free software movement is basically a movement for freedom. It's based on values that are not purely material and practical. It's based on the idea that freedom is a benefit in itself. And that being allowed to be part of a community is a benefit in itself, having neighbors who can help you, who are free to help you - they are not told that they are pirates if they help you - is a benefit in itself, and that that's even more important than how powerful and reliable your software is...'"

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